日本とアメリカの高校生活を比べてみよう!

このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

Junko と Megumi はそれぞれアメリカと日本で高校生活を送りました。アメリカのドラマなどで出てくる学校のシーンを見ると日本の高校とかなり違った印象を持ちます。通学、制服、部活や授業などなど、ひとつづつ比較してみましょう!

Junko and Megumi spent their high school years in America and Japan. When you watch American TV shows, there is this image that the high schools there are completely different from Japanese high schools. Transportation, uniforms, clubs, classes, so and so forth. Let’s take a look at just how different they are!


高校時代はティーンにとってすごく大事な時ですよね。高校でどのように過ごそうか、どのクラスを取ろうか、どんな服を着ようか、どのクラブに入ろうか、などいろいろです。小学校も中学校も違いますが、高校の違いのほうが大きいと思います。大学ももちろん違いますが、高校のほうが大きな違いにインパクトがあります。
日本とアメリカの高校のライフスタイルの違いはなんでしょうか?私たち、MegumiとJunkoが個人の経験からそれぞれの違いについて話しますよ!

High school is such an important part of life when you’re in your teenage years. How you spend high school, what classes you take, how you dress, what clubs you partake in, so on and so forth. While elementary and middle school may differ also, the idea of high school is much larger. College is different, yes, but high school leaves a much stronger impact.
So what exactly is the differences between the high school lifestyle in Japan and America? We, Megumi and Junko, will draw from our own personal experiences to explain what the difference is like!

Photo: Junko

Photo: Junko

Classrooms/クラス

Junko: クラスは一概にほとんど同じですが、アメリカの場合、生徒たちが移動をすることが主流です。例えば、学校の建物自体がすごく大きくて、区切りになっていることがあります。私の最初の学校では、数学のクラスは一階の東側に面していて、言語のクラスは2階の西側にあります。英語のクラスは、2階の東側にあって歴史のクラスは2階の中央に位置していたりしました。生徒が先生たちの部屋に移動するので、波のようにクラス間を移動する生徒たちがいて大変です。クラスがどこに位置しているかによって、ロッカーに立ち寄って本や次の授業の本を取りにいくことができますが、もし、クラスの移動のせいで、次の授業に間に合わなかったら大量の重い本を持ち歩くことになります。
Megumi: 日本では、新しいクラスが毎年決められます。それらをホームルームと呼ぶことが多いです。在学中はそのクラスが自分の名札のようなものになります。ほとんどの授業はHRのクラスと受けますが、高校二年生や三年生になると、歴史、言語、英語、数学などのクラスはわかれるようになります。アメリカではどの先生のクラスに属するかといいますが、日本では「3年A組」「1年C組」「3年3組」などといいます。(最初の数字は学年、二番目の数字/アルファベットはクラス)

Junko: First, while classrooms are classrooms and they are all generally the same, in America for every class, students move. For example, often times the school buildings are quite large and you have sections. At my first school, the math classrooms were on the east side on the first floor, while language classes were on the 2nd floor on the west side. English class was on the east side 2nd floor, and history class was in the center of the second floor and so on. The students move to the teachers room, which makes passing time (the time between each class) a river of students traveling. Depending on where you classes are located, you either have time to stop by your locker to drop your books off and grab other books, or you will have to carry around books for classes until you have the opportunity to drop off these extremely heavy hard covered text books.
Megumi: In Japan, we have classes that are assigned to us every year, which we call HR(Home Room) classes.Your assigned classroom is sort of your identification during high school. You basically do everything with your HR classmates but when we become junior and seniors, math, history, English classes and such will be separated. In the US, you will say which teacher’s class you are in, but you will mostly say that your in “3-A” , “1-C”, “3-3” etc. in Japan (the first number is which school year your in, the second number/alphabet is which class).

Photo: Junko

Photo: Junko

Lockers/ロッカー

Junko: ロッカーの文化について触れましょう。ロッカーを使う目的は冬の重いコートや、持ち歩く必要のない教科書を置くためのものです。オレゴンにあった学校では、ロッカーパートナーがいて、一緒にロッカーを共有しました。しだいに、彼女とはすごく仲良くなったので、すごくいい結果でした。ロッカーは、スケボーやお弁当、部活の道具などをしまうことができるものでもあります。授業の合間に立ち寄ったりもします。ロッカーは動き回る家って感じですね。
Megumi: 日本では、ロッカーはありますが、ほとんどクラスの中にあります。私のアメリカのロッカーのイメージだと、廊下にある気がします。あと個人のロッカーが日本では主流です。私の学校では、ロッカーにかぎをかけることがなかったのでなんでなにも盗まれたことがないのか不思議ですが・・・あっ!学校指定のカバンを机の横にかけていたからだっ!

Junko: Which now brings me to the whole locker culture. Lockers are a place where you can dump your winter coat in along with your heavy text books and binders that you don’t necessarily need to carry around to every class. At my school in Oregon, I had a locker partner, who I shared with. She ended up becoming a very good friend of mine, and we got along great. Lockers are a place where you can also store your skateboard or lunch or your extra bag that has your basketball gear in. They are the pit stop everyone makes between classes. Lockers become your mobile home at school.
Megumi: In Japan, we do have our own lockers but most of the lockers are in your classroom. I imagine most of the lockers are in the hallways in the US, but we have are own individual lockers. At least in my school, we didn’t have keys to lock our locker so I don’t know why I never had my stuff stolen…oh, we had our school bags hanging from our desk right beside us. That’s why!

Photo: Thomas

Photo: Thomas

Cleaning/ 掃除

Junko: アメリカの学生はあまり掃除をしません。ロッカーを掃除する以外に、学校を掃除するのは生徒に課せられるものではりません。施設を綺麗にしてくれるお掃除のおじさん・おばさんがいます。しかし、もし悪いことをした生徒がいたりしたら、罰として掃除をすることがあります。
Megumi: 日本では、掃除をすごく真剣にします。学校のクラスが公式的に終わったあとでも、先生が教室に居残って、きちんと掃除当番が掃除をしているか監視されることが多いです。私の学校では、どのクラスにいるかによって掃除をする場所も変わりました。私が3年生のときは、HR、3年生のトイレ、美術室、音楽室などが掃除担当でした。

Junko: Cleaning isn’t something that students do in America. Aside from cleaning your locker, students aren’t responsible for cleaning the school. There are janitors that go around cleaning the facilities. Although, there are cases in which students who have misbehaved are forced to clean as a punishment during detention.
Megumi: In Japan, we take our cleaning very seriously. The teachers will even stay in class after you’re done cleaning to see if the people who are in charge of the cleaning for the week had done their job. In my school, depending on which classroom you are in, the places we were assigned to clean differed. My classroom during my senior year, had to do our HR, the senior toilets, the art room, and the music room.

Sports/スポーツ

Junko: アメリカでは、スポーツは季節によってやります。秋にはサッカー、クロスカントリー、水球、フットボールがあります。冬は、バスケ、水泳、ホッケー、スキー、スノボなどどこに学校があるかにもよります。春は、陸上、テニス、ラクロス、ラグビーなど様々なスポーツが一年で繰り広げられます。スポーツは年によってではなく、季節によってやるので、生徒たちが一年間で様々なスポーツに挑戦できる環境をつくっています。私は、クロスカントリー、バスケ、陸上、テニスを経験しました。
Megumi: 日本では、一度中学一年生で始めたクラブは卒業をするまでやめることがほとんどありません。私はテニス部に所属していましたが、3年経ったでも二人しか辞めませんでした。一度にたくさんのクラブに所属することは珍しく、正直柔軟性には問われるますが、一生涯の友達ができることも確かです!(ラッキーだったらね!)また、文化部と運動部ーという言い方があります。文化部の人は静かで、優しくて、フレンドリーな人が多い反面、運動部はうるさくて傲慢で怖い人が多いです(固定概念ですが)。

Junko: In American, sports are done seasonally. In the fall, you have soccer, cross country, water polo, volley ball, and football. In the winter you have basketball, swimming, and hockey, skiing and snowboarding depending on your location. During the spring you have track and field, tennis, lacrosse, rugby, baseball soft ball, and golf. Because sports are done by season instead of yearly, it allows students to participate in numerous sport clubs throughout the year.
I personally participated in cross country, basketball, track and field and tennis throughout my high school career.
Megumi: In Japan, once you join a club in the beginning in 7th grade (Junior high fresh man year), it is common to stay in the same club until you graduate as a senior in high school. During high school, only 2 girls quit our team. It is rare to be joining several clubs at once so I have to agree that it’s not very flexible, but at the same time, you will earn your life-long friends if you are in the same club for numerous years! (If you’re lucky!) Also, we have a term called Bunka-bu and Undo-bu, which means cultural clubs and sports clubs. Bunka-bu people tend to be quite, nice, and friendly people while undo-bu tends to be loud, stuck up, and mean people (stereotypically speaking).

Photo: Junko

Photo: Junko

Photo: Thomas

Photo: Thomas

Uniform/制服

Junko: 私立でなければ制服は着ません。でも私立なら制服はあります。私立と公立でもどこに位置するかによって制服みたいに厳しく私服を規制することがあります。ほとんどの公立の高校では、とてもシンプルなドレスコードを守れば大丈夫です。
Megumi: 日本では、私立でも公立でも必ず制服を着ます。よく言われるのはかわいい女の子・かわいい制服の学校はどこだ、またその逆もよく言われることです。私の高校は比較的かわいい制服がありました。高校生になった瞬間すごく嬉しいことは、制服の靴下が紺色になるということ!昔中学生のときは白だったんです!白ソックスだなんて!いやだ!!!

Junko: Uniforms are usually not something that schools require unless it is private. Private schools will often times have an uniform. Private and public schools both, depending on the district will have a strict dress code that can be similar to an uniform. But most public high schools do not have a strict dress code and are quite simple to follow.
Megumi: Whether you are in a private school or public school in Japan, you will most definitely have a school uniform. We have a thing where people like to compare which high school has the cutest girls/uniforms. My school had a relatively cute uniform in high school and it was such a proud moment when you stepped foot in high school, because they had navy socks that go with your uniform! In junior high, they were white socks! LIKE EW!

Photo: Kristina

Photo: Kristina

Photo: Kristina

Photo: Kristina

Lunch/お昼

Junko: ほとんどの学校は2つ、また3つのランチタイムが設けられています。Aランチ、Bランチがあって、これはクラスがどこにあるかによって決まります。例えば、4限が東棟にあったら、Aランチで、4限のクラスの前に食べるということです。また、Bランチだと4限のあとに食べることになります。それ以外に、学校に持ってきたランチを食べるか学校の食堂で買ってカフェテリアで食べたりします。上級クラスの人たちは、オフキャンパスでランチをすることができます。学校のせわしいひとときから逃れるのはいい機会ですよね。
Megumi: 日本では、学校のカフェテリアというものがないのがほとんでお弁当を持ってくることが主流です。本当にお弁当をずっと6年間作ってくれていたお母さん・お父さんに感謝ですよね!だって、すごくおいしいお弁当で朝の6時につくってくれるんですよ!それ献身的すぎ!私の学校では、ローソンが毎回お昼にきてくれるので、12時半になった瞬間、みんな疾走するんです!一番いいご飯と一番おいしいスイーツのために!!

Junko: Many schools will have at least two lunch times if not three. There is A lunch and B lunch, and this is all depending on where your classroom is. For example, if your 4th period class is on the east wing, then you will have A lunch, which is before your 4th period class. Or, if you have B lunch, it is after your 4th period class.
Aside from that, students eat either their own lunch they brought to school, or buy a school meal, or buy something from the school store and eat it in the cafeteria. The upper class men are allowed to go off campus and eat lunch during their break time, which is a nice privilege for those who want to get away from the bustling school environment for a few moments.
Megumi: In Japan, we do not have a cafeteria in most of the schools so bringing an Obento (lunch boxes) is normal for us. I think we all have to appreciated the hard work of our mothers/fathers who made lunches for us during our school years! I mean making a hardcore delicious lunch box every morning from 6:00 AM?! That’s some dedication! At my school, we had a Lawson that came in every lunch time so the minute the clock strikes at 12:30, kids RAN with their wallet in hand to get the BEST meal or BEST sweets!

Photo: Junko

Photo: Junko

Transportation/交通の便

Junko: 最後は、交通の便についてです。アメリカの高校のイメージは、車で登校をすることが主流ですが、バスも使われます。もちろん、あの黄色のスクールバスですよ。アメリカでは16歳にならないと車に乗れないので、高校一年生はバスか、両親・兄弟に車で送ってもらいます。駐車場は、学校によりますが、生徒たちの成績によって決まってきます。ほとんどのいい駐車場のスポットは上級生が取ります。何人かは歩いたり、自転車で行ったりしますが、大多数は、無料バスか免許をとって車で行くようにします。
Megumi: 日本では、電車かバスを使って登校します。スクールバスはありませんし、学校に車で行く事も絶対ありません。しかし、私の母はアメリカ人なので大降りの雨だったりして、母の機嫌がいい日は車で送ってくれたことがあります。私はそれがあまりにイレギュラーで目立ってしまうことだったので、生徒にみられたくありませんでした。でもよく考えてみたらすごく私かっこよくないですか!学校に車がくるとか!ファンシー!

Junko: Finally, let’s touch on transportation. While the image of American high school kids driving is quite prominent, there are also buses. Yes, those yellow school buses go all the way up to high school. Because the legal driving age isn’t until you’re 16 in most states, freshmen get to school by bus or being driven by a parent or sibling. Many schools have different areas in which students are allowed to park in depending on their grade. Often leaving the best spots on campus for the seniors.
Megumi: Some students do walk or bike to school, but the majority of students will utilize the free bus services or drive once they get their license.
In Japan, you get on the public trains or buses to go to school. There aren’t any school buses or a parents dropping you off at school. However, my mom is American, so whenever it was pouring rain and my mom was a in a good mood, she took me to school by car. I didn’t want any of the other students to see that because it was so out of the ordinary and I didn’t want to stand out. But now that I think of it, I was ballin‘! A car driving me to school? So fancy.

Photo: Junko

Photo: Junko

日本とアメリカの小学校と中学校は大きな違いがあります。教育文化の違いとしては、高校はすごく大きな違いが生まれてくると思います。今回は一部のことしか触れていませんが、みんなはどっちの高校がいい?アメリカ?日本?みなさんの経験はなに?教えてね!

Elementary and middle school is still quite different between Japan and America, but high school is still one of the biggest differences within the education culture. Although we only touched on certain parts of the education culture, do you have a preference between Japanese high schools and American high schools? What are some of your experiences? Let us know!

~Junko & Megumi